​​​​Author of cross genre psychological thrillers and romantic comedies, all with strong female protagonists


PHILIP OLDFIELD

Do you love to or long to play with words, to roll them across paper, to suspend them in space, in orbit around your mind, to listen to how they sound and feel and to do battle in the cut and thrust of crafting them on to the screen? I do. I love to write and I write every day. Here are my 10 writing tips. Oh, and take time out for a glass or two with friends.

See and observe people; feel empathy for their lives

Read, watch and reflect

Observe the animate and give life to the inanimate

Draft your storyboard on A3 paper

Follow your first thoughts

Vary how you write

Pick any topic, write a story in three minutes

Allow characters and scenes to speak to you

If you move your hands when talking, use dictation software

Edit final drafts several times; playback on your computer


Writing Tips 


See and observe people; feel empathy for their lives

Read, watch and reflect

Observe the animate and give life to the inanimate

Draft your storyboard on A3 paper

Follow your first thoughts

Vary how you write

Pick any topic, write a story in three minutes

Allow characters and scenes to speak to you

If you move your hands when talking, use dictation software

Edit final drafts several times; playback on your computer


Oh, and take time out for a glass or two with friends.


Be Creative - Writing Tips - Author - Philip Oldfield

And so to the images below...

Think Big... there are no limits... think outside of the glass... enjoy writing and reading... practice writing on any subject for 3 minutes... keep handy, inspirational quotes... edit - reflect - edit - proofread final drafts.

Write until your heart bleeds

Write until your heart bleeds. This was the mantra I penned for myself and have pinned to my cork board on the wall adjacent to my desk. The sentiment still resonates. I imagine it always will. Deeply.


I use A3 size paper for outline concepts. I take the central ideas as circles. From there, I lasso outline characters and events and scatter them on the page creating a swirl of connections and questions, yet to be answered, and draw them all together into a growing semblance of a whole.

Next, I map an overall storyboard, in broad terms, frame by frame, allowing parallel storylines to flow left to right over the course of time and events. In the final process, I gather the papier mâché of ideas and consider which I feel are best suited to potential chapters in the novel.


​Thereafter, I focus on two core activities: research and writing. I allow the words of the story, the characters and how they feel and behave to grow and change, as they will, when they talk back to you, as they do.